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Coronet Inside Out: Hanif Kureishi

WHAT WE TALK ABOUT WHEN WE TALK ABOUT WRITING

As part of Coronet Inside Out we are excited to announce a one-off online Q&A session with Hanif Kureishi for young and emerging writers on Wednesday 22nd Apr, which is now available to watch online for free. Kureishi is considered one of the most significant writers of his generation, with The Times including him in their list of “The 50 greatest British writers since 1945”.

During the session, Hanif explored his own creative process: sharing insights into how he approaches his work, as well as explaining how he developed his own writing career. This was followed by a Q&A session, where Hanif answered pre-selected questions from the online audience.

Additional Information

Hanif Kureishi was born in Kent and read philosophy at King’s College, London. In 1981 he won the George Devine Award for his plays Outskirts and Borderline and the following year became writer in residence at the Royal Court Theatre, London.

His 1984 screenplay for the film My Beautiful Laundrette was nominated for an Oscar. He also wrote the screenplays  Sammy and Rosie Get Laid (1987), London Kills Me (1991), The Mother (2003) and Venus (2006). A screenplay adapted from Kureishi’s novel The Black Album was published in 2009.

The Buddha of Suburbia (1990) won the Whitbread Prize for Best First Novel and was produced as a four-part drama for the BBC in 1993. His second novel was The Black Album (1995). The next, Intimacy (1998), was adapted as a film in 2001, winning the Golden Bear Award at the Berlin Film festival. Gabriel’s Gift was published in 2001, Something to Tell You in 2008 and The Last Word in 2014.

His first collection of short stories, Love in a Blue Time, appeared in 1997, followed by Midnight All Day (1999) and The Body (2002), Love + Hate (2015). Hanif Kureishi was awarded the C.B.E. for his services to literature, and the Chevalier de l’Ordre des Arts des Lettres in France. His works have been translated into 36 languages.